Author: Charlotte Bearn

Rob Wass Answers Your Questions!

Rob Wass Answers YOUR Questions!

We asked YOU to send in some questions for brilliant contemporary artist Rob Wass to answer.


 

artrepublic: How did your work evolve from a more urban graffiti style to the style you have now?

Rob: From painting graffiti back in my teens I learnt how to use a can of paint and what could be achieved with it. I put these techniques back into my illustration work and went from there.

 

artrepublic: How does the process start when creating a new piece?

Rob: It depends what I’m making but usually I jot an idea down, let it sit there (if it's not time sensitive) for a while and try to build ideas off of it. If the idea still seems good then I’ll do a load of sketches trying to push the idea in different directions until hopefully coming across something that is visually striking or meaningful.

 

artrepublic: How long did it take you to develop your style/process? Or is it still a work in progress?

Rob: I think when it comes to style, that came from quite a young age. I was always interested in geometric shapes and bright colours and today these 2 core components are still crucial in my work. Its definitely a work in progress, I think of style like a formula now, I have my core elements that I try and incorporate in most of the work I make so there’s a cohesion between old and new but then I'll try new things or take some things away until if find an updated style that works.

 

artrepublic: What's your favourite part of the art process? What's the hardest?

Rob: My favourite part is still the making for makings sake just playing with no goals in mind. The hardest is probably working on an idea for a month and at the end of the month saying to myself it's still not good enough start again.

 

artrepublic: What's your studio space like? Do you keep it tidy? What kind of space do you work best in?

Rob: Messy most of the time but I do try to have a little tidy up after each project. I think I'm happy working in most spaces really but I’ve always wanted a warehouse to run wild in.

Check out Rob's latest collection of treescapes here - you won't regret it!

art to arrive by christmas

£300

55 x 70cm

Zoe Moss £150

Just Wanna Be Loved

29.7 x 42 cm

£150

29.7 x 42 cm

Falling Bears Artwork by Rhys Brown
Exclusive

Falling Bears

70 x 47cm

£450

70 x 47cm

Cherries

42 x 59.4cm

£200

42 x 59.4cm

CMY Bob

60 x 84cm

£159

60 x 84cm

£35

15 x 15 cm

Odi Et Amo - Small

30 x 30cm

£125

30 x 30cm

Lose Yourself - Blue

29.7 x 42 cm

£85

29.7 x 42 cm

Future Penguin

35 x 50cm

£150

35 x 50cm

Shuby £45

Love Banana

42 x 29.7cm

£45

42 x 29.7cm

Masterpiece Plus Art Print by Remi Rough
Exclusive

Masterpiece Plus

42 x 29.7cm

£190

42 x 29.7cm

Love's a game
Exclusive

Love's a game

50 x 50cm

£150

50 x 50cm

Not My First Rodeo (11th Edition) Art Print by Babak Ganjei
Exclusive

£135

50 x 70cm

£150

50 x 70cm

BALLOON DOG 7 Art Print by VeeBee
Exclusive
VeeBee £270

BALLOON DOG 7

21 x 29.7cm

£270

21 x 29.7cm

Tom Lewis £125

Stag

30 x 30 cm

£125

30 x 30 cm

Choco Happy Dog

12 x 6 x 12cm

£300

12 x 6 x 12cm

£48

6 x 10 cm

RYCA £80

Blowing A Kiss

12 x 12cm

£80

12 x 12cm

United Colour of London Art Print by Jayson Lilley
Exclusive

£195

31 x 24cm

Rise no.1 Art Print by Lisa Lloyd
Exclusive

Rise no.1

60 x 60cm

£150

60 x 60cm

£220

59 x 70.5cm

Canary

40 x 50cm

£150

40 x 50cm

£50

50 x 70cm

Gorilla - Pink Foil

42 x 59.4cm

£195

42 x 59.4cm

Love is the Drug - Pink Diamond Dust, 2020 Art Print by Ryan Callanan
Exclusive

£200

60 x 60cm

Twilight

32.x 44cm

£65

32.x 44cm

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